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Anchor Trolley Install

Discussion in 'Stakeout and Anchoring Systems' started by GlockGuy, Jan 7, 2012.

  1. GlockGuy

    GlockGuy Member

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    I have found that I NEVER remove my trolley, and I also like it a bit lower than most folks, so it doesn't interfere with anything on deck. Consequently, while I could have mounted my anchor trolley using existing fittings on my kayak, and used a method that would allow removal, I didn't.
    First, I gathered all my supplies. The it had more parts than what is shown here, but these are the pieces that I needed for this particular install. My only additions were the sewing kit, 20 lb. PowerPro braid and some reflective cording -

    [​IMG]

    I decided to start at the rear of the kayak. I knew I wouldn't be able to get to the inside of the hull here, so rivets were called for. These black ones blend with the deck loop and also have rubber on them to seal things up, but I added a dab of LEXEL anyway. It isn't shown, but I was VERY CAREFUL to choose a drill bit that was JUST BARELY BIG ENOUGH to make a hole to get the rivet through -

    [​IMG]

    Since these rivets sit pretty much flush, I decided to use a deck loop with a flat mounting surface. The countersunk deck loop will be used up forward -

    [​IMG]

    Since I had some PowerPro braid and a nut handy, I made my own plumb bob to keep things straight -

    [​IMG]

    The rear deck loop, installed -

    [​IMG]

    Up front, I knew that I wanted a deck loop inside as well as out, even though Wildy puts some tie down line on the inside of the hatch. Never hurts to ensure you have the right size drill bit -

    [​IMG]

    Installed -

    [​IMG]

    The deck loop inside acts as a washer as well as an additional tie down point. Of course, I used a dab of LEXEL on these holes as well -

    [​IMG]

    Next, it was time to add my pulleys. I chose to take some reflective paracord that I had and pull the core filaments out. This will allow it to stretch a bit, but not as much as a bungee does. It also adds to my safety margin, by being reflective -

    [​IMG]

    Slip on a piece of heat shrink and assemble. I used PowerPro braid to sew the ends together. After all, I'm an angler, not a seamstress -

    [​IMG]

    Move the heat shrink over it and melt 'er down. This connection is NOT coming apart -

    [​IMG]

    I repeated that on both ends and then moved to the actual trolley line and ring. Here it is already sewed up and heat shrinked -

    [​IMG]

    I made sure that I ran the line through the ring before making the final connection. This keeps the trolley line from pulling away from the hull in wind or current -

    [​IMG]

    Check it all for proper functioning. I actually had the line a bit too loose, and cut my last stiches, pulled the line tighter and restiched it. THEN, I completed the final heatshrink -

    [​IMG]

    The finished product -

    [​IMG]

    As you can see, I added some STS circles where the pulleys go. This will prevent them from banging. I went with circles instead of rectangles because corners tend to peel and circles don't have corners!

    Shown with my preferred stake-out pole - The YakAttack PARK-N-Pole, which serves dual duty as a stake-out pole and also allows me to pole my kayak when paddling isn't possible.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2012
  2. n2bassfishing

    n2bassfishing New Member

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    Looks good Mike
     
  3. vafish

    vafish New Member

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    Looks clean and neat like it came that way from the factory. Nice work!!
     
  4. Journeyman

    Journeyman New Member

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    How's the trolley holding up? I'm rigging my Trident and used the same technique with the stripped nite line, lashing and heat shrink. I like it, it looks cool, but I keep second guessing the lack of shock absorbancy bungee adds. What do you think?
     
  5. Hanover_Yakker

    Hanover_Yakker Member

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    Nicely done Mike, although with my luck, I would get slammed into a bridge piling and rip those deck loops out or crack the hull :rolleyes:
     
  6. GlockGuy

    GlockGuy Member

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    Bungee gives TOO much, IMHO. Unmodified paracord doesn't stretch enough. However, pulling those 7 core strands out of the paracord allows it to stretch, but not as much as bungee. A very happy medium.

    As for the deck loop attachment points, this is the 3rd kayak that I have attached a trolley to in this fashion and I've had zero issues.
     
  7. swampcobra

    swampcobra New Member

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    Nice install, good looking 135 as well :cool:

    DM<
     
  8. robchoi

    robchoi New Member

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    Very nice. Although, personally, I would put the deck loops more on top of the kayak. I rub up on pilings on a regular basis and sometime bump pretty hard.

    But like I said, very nice for the kind of fishing you do.
     
  9. Lt.FireDog

    Lt.FireDog Administrator

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    GG, trolley came out nice. [​IMG]

    Like Rob, I'm more for the trolley towards the top of gunnels. I also like the trolley to run as far forward & rearward as possible and I incorporate bungee into all the trolley's I've installed. This is the latest; Ocean Kayak Ultra 4.7 with a two-part trolley...not sure if the newly arrived Trident 13 Angler will have a one or two-piece trolley.
    I tried something new and applied the fuzzy-sided velcro on the back of the Harken blocks.....good sound deadening for cheap.

    Pics running bow to stern-

    IMG_20120110_220446.jpg IMG_20120110_222735.jpg IMG_20120110_220345.jpg IMG_20120110_220631.jpg IMG_20120110_220322.jpg
     
  10. Hanover_Yakker

    Hanover_Yakker Member

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    I like the idea of using the fuzzy pieces on the back of the pulleys. Might have to consider that when I go to do my anchor trolley setup.
     
  11. Journeyman

    Journeyman New Member

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    I've been following Lt's trolley install on another board, but have used some ideas from bot of ya'll. What I lack in originality, I like to make up for in excecution.

    LT, at your aft pad eye, did you use well nuts due to lack of access back there? I did on my Redfish, and never had any trouble with 'em pulling out, but I used bungee's as shock cord. This time I lashed the nite line casing to the tie down thing at the back end of the tank well.

    photo.jpg

    Now I'm just waiting on the mail for the last few pcs.
     
  12. Lt.FireDog

    Lt.FireDog Administrator

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    JM,
    on the Ultra 4.3 & 4.7 the molded in threaded inserts (like on your Trident's deck hardware) are there for the factory trolley system. The problem is that as of right now, that accessory is not being imported from New Zealand so I had to find padeyes that fit the odd sized ones that are needed (which I found at West Marine).
    I have used wellnuts in other applications; flush mounts, zig-zag cleats, padeye's for anchor trolley on OK Drifter and RAM mounts, with no problems at all. The nice thing about wellnuts is they are watertight...no sealants needed.
     

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